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Sunday, August 8, 2010

When Things Don't Go Our Way

           The Hebrew prophet Jonah was instructed by God to go to Nineveh to warn its people that they were going to be destroyed if they did not turn to God.   Instead, Jonah ran in the opposite direction to escape from God.  Jonah was put back on God's course partly by being swallowed by a giant fish which returned him to land.  Jonah was successful in delivering his message to the Ninevites and getting them to repent and avoid God's wrath, but he was also resentful that God would save these evil people who were the enemies of Israel.  As he waited to see whether the city would be destroyed or not, God miraculously provided Jonah with a vine to shelter him from the blazing sun.   Jonah was happy to have this shade.

         But at dawn the next day God provided a worm, which chewed the vine so that it withered.   When the sun rose, God provided a scorching east wind, and the sun blazed on Jonah's head so that he grew faint. He wanted to die, and said, "It would be better for me to die than to live."
Jonah 4:7-8 (New International Version)

        In this short book of the Bible, we see Jonah as a man who behaves in a stubborn and childish manner.  He tries to hide, he stomps and pouts when he doesn't get his way, and he becomes totally self-absorbed without gratitude for the good things he has received and angry when those he thinks are undeserving receive blessings.  Jonah was obviously missing something in the account given in this book and he clearly needed instruction from God.

         Jonah was not recognizing that God is God of all of the Earth and of all peoples.   God blessed the Israelites, but they did not hold an exclusive claim to God.  God's compassion is directed to all who repent, believe, and sincerely beseech his mercy.  God wanted to show Jonah that even the Ninevites could be worthy of His compassion just as all sinners are.   One of the steps in the learning process was to bless Jonah and then take away the blessing so that he would suffer.

         In another book of the Bible we read the story of Job, who reacts to this concept in a very different way.  Job loses family, home, property, friends, and health and eventually is much worse off than we ever see Jonah.  However, instead of insolent behavior toward God, he accepts his fate and continues to honor Him. 

         Job said:    "Naked I came from my mother's womb, and naked I will depart.   The LORD gave and the LORD has taken away; may the name of the LORD be praised."
Job 1:21 (New International Version)

         Job got it, but when we see Jonah in today's episode we see that he has not.   Jonah was angry with God because God showed compassion to the sinful Ninevites.   And yet, Jonah has failed to see the compassion God repeatedly shows him after his disobedience and his lack of respect.  God saves Jonah from drowning by sending a big fish to carry him back to land; God saves Jonah from death inside the belly of a giant fish by causing the fish to expel Jonah onto dry land: and God shields Jonah from the discomfort of the hot desert sun by providing him shade.  Now God takes away the shade to provide a lesson.

        Jonah is going to have to have this explained directly by God, who has been extremely patient with Jonah.   Next week we will learn the lesson that God wants Jonah to understand.

       But this week we once again hear Jonah saying that he would rather die than deal with his suffering.  This leads me to a thought that may be going out on a limb a bit.  When I think about what Jonah says I think about people who are suffering with pain and sickness, or dealing with things that they find to be personal injustices, or have some other inner problem that might lead to the extreme measure of suicide.  Jonah is not suggesting that he is going to kill himself, but he wants to die because of what he is going through.

        I don't think that God wants any of us to suffer, but is there sometimes a lesson in suffering?  Do any of us have the right to end our suffering by taking our own lives?   Likewise, if we consider euthanasia, does anyone have the right to end another's suffering by ending their life?  I'm not talking about pulling the plug on life support, but I am referring to the direct action of killing another human being because they are suffering.  Should death be the domain of God alone?   I am not addressing the acts of killing in war or the death penalty, but some would show abhorrence to these actions, and yet condone acts of euthanasia or abortion.  Do we ever have the right to take a life because someone is suffering physically, emotionally, financially, or for any other reason?

 Teach me your way, O LORD,
and I will walk in your truth;
give me an undivided heart,
that I may fear your name.


 I will praise you, O Lord my God, with all my heart;
I will glorify your name forever.


 For great is your love toward me;
you have delivered me from the depths of the grave.


 The arrogant are attacking me, O God;
a band of ruthless men seeks my life—
men without regard for you.


 But you, O Lord, are a compassionate and gracious God,
slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness.


 Turn to me and have mercy on me;
grant your strength to your servant
and save the son of your maidservant.


 Give me a sign of your goodness,
that my enemies may see it and be put to shame,
for you, O LORD, have helped me and comforted me.


Psalm 86:11-17 (New International Version)

11 comments:

Journaling Woman said...

Lee, I sadly see parts of Jonah in me. I am constantly working on that.

One thing I see in him is his self righteous attitude (which is not my issue - really-no really:). He seems a bit self absorbed and thereby selfish and uncaring.

Great Sunday post.

Teresa

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Don't have an answer for you. Only God knows what's going on in their minds those last moments.

Bud Ezekiel said...

Job and his suffering continues to re-surface in my life. There’s something there that God wants to give me an understanding in and this one hasn’t been able to grasp it. Or maybe God is using Job to temper the anger within me. As said before in this series, Jonah and i are a LOT alike in character and in attitude! And just like you’re words, Lee (Jonah didn’t get it/wasn’t getting it)...

Right now i’m more like Jonah then i am like Jesus BUT am being transformed and someday that will be reversed:)

i hope you take this entire series Lee and put it in your side-bar someplace.

welcome to my world of poetry said...

I don't think we have a right to voice our opinions on sush a subject, Do we know what torment and suffering that is going on, There was a person on TV the other day who could only move his eyes, I wonder how and what he was feeling.

Yvonne.

Stephen Tremp said...

We just watched the first Veggie Tales about Jonah movie with the kids (Jonah was a prophet ... doodley-doo ... but he never really got it... doodley do). There's a lesson of obedience and thankfulness to be learned.

Stephen Tremp

Jules said...

Again I think God is teaching us, period. Can one truly be thankful for anything if one has never suffered? I believe suffering to some extent is part of the education, whether it be the sufferer or those people who surround the one suffering.

As to my take on your questions; I would not ask someone to do something I could not do myself, I cannot kill. And in saying that I do not judge either, I leave that up to God.

Wonderful Sunday post and I've passed your blog on to my Mom. She will just love your Sunday posts.
Trying To Get Over The Rainbow

DiscConnected said...

>Do any of us have the right to >end our suffering by taking our >own lives?

Lee, this is one of those dilemnas I hope I never have to face.

I have watched two people I care about wither away and die from cancer. The first time (my best friend's mother), I was too young to think such heavy thoughts, but the second time (my younger sister), there was nothing I would not have done to take away the suffering.

Did you see "Million Dollar Baby?" Clint Eastwood's character had one heckuva moral struggle on his hands.

Fortunately, my sister did not put me in that predicament-her faith was strong and she faced the ravages of the disease without complaint.

I would have been one miserable SOB-enough so that people would probably have stood in line to pull my plug.

Do we have the right to end our lives? I guess the book says no.

Does that mean we have to use every form of modern medicine available to try to prolong our lives? I hope that is not the case. Chemotherapy (at least from what I have seen) is worse than the disease.

I believe all life (and all lives) are precius. But at the risk of sounding like a Byrds song, I also believe that to everything there is a season, and when my winter comes, I hope for a quick one.

Larry

Connie Arnold said...

This is certainly a thought provoking post! We all have so much to learn, and I agree that we learn lessons through our suffering that can make us better people, more like what God wants us to be. I only know to pray and trust God for what is right because we have such a limited view of what God sees and knows about each life.

Elizabeth Mahlou said...

Well, ultimately, Jonah had to do it God's way, anyway! I've had a Jonah experience in my life and have learned that what God wants God gets!

Diana said...

I always love your Sunday posts Arlee. I am afraid that I acted a bit like Jonah today when my dryer of 20 plus years , bit the dust. I was nearly kicking and screaming!
I am very frugal which is why I was so angry.
So I need to forget it and say a prayer.
About your question, I don't have an answer. I would have to pray a lot if I were in any of those situations. Love Di ♥

arlee bird said...

I thank all of you for your considerations of this topic and the comments that you left. I know I tossed in a bit of controversy here, but it was something that began to weigh heavily upon me as I began to study this passage.